The 17th International Conference on Product-Focused Software Process Improvement

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Tutorials

PROFES 2016 will host seven exciting tutorials that will complement and enhance the main conference program, offering a wider knowledge perspective around the conference topics. Tutorials are expected to provide insights into special topics of current and ongoing relevance to the conference focus areas. And our goal is to have practitioners from different companies participating on that day.
The tutorials will be held on November 22nd, 2016. And each participant has the chance to choose two half-day tutorials, or one full day tutorial to participate on that day. Come and join us in this exciting day! If you only want to register for tutorials, please sign-up at www.softwareindustryday.com to reserve your seat.

Program summary

Tuesday November 22nd, 2016: Tutorials and Workshops

Track 1: Innovation and Speed Track 2: Software Security Track 3: Software Quality Track 4: Regulated Software Track 5: DEVOPS and Lean Startups Track 6: Continuous Deployment Track 7: Human factors in Software Development Track 8: Doctoral symposium
Morning (08:00-09:00) Registration
Morning (09:00-12:00) T1: Design Thinking for Software Innovations – a crash course in rough physical prototyping (Martin Steinert, Federico Lozano and Matilde Bisballe) T3: Practical Software Security in a Continuously Deploying World (Martin Gilje Jaatun and Inger Anne Tøndel) T4: Risk-Based Software Testing: Increasing Effectiveness and Efficiency in Testing (Michael Felderer and Rudolf Ramler) T6: Experience from integrating Agile development with process standards like ASPICE and ISO 26262 (Even-Andre Karlsson) T8: Creating Champions and battling Dragons – how to create a DevOps culture (Pål Thomassen and Ingrid Sorgendal) T10: Hands on with Docker (Mike Long)

Workshop on Human Factors in Software Development Processes: Measuring System Quality

Doctoral symposium

Afternoon (13:00-16:00) T2: Continuous Experimentation: Accelerating Innovation through Highly Effective Experiments (Jürgen Münch) T5: Architecture Evaluation – threat or opportunity (Even-Andre Karlsson) T7: Safe Scrum (Geir Kjetil Hanssen, Thor Myklebust, Tor Stålhane and Børge Haugset) T9: Lean startups in established companies: How to make it really happen and how to avoid common pitfalls (Nils Brede Moe and Tone Merethe Aasen) T11: User centric cloud computing  (Hogne Titlestad and Thomas Wollburg)

T1: Design Thinking for Software Innovations – a crash course in rough physical prototyping

Martin Steinert

Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Federico Lozano

Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Matilde Bisballe

Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Description

dt-copy-xfcrbhMost developers consider themselves good at prototyping. Agile methods are nowadays common and a mandatory skill of a software developer. A challenge in this setup is the risk that the requirements one is building for are out-dated, go against each other or simply do not fulfill the user’s true need and expectations.
This can have severe consequences when meeting a certain deadline. Though code is delivered in time and in accordance to the project and requirements, very often the underlying aim is not (fully) achieved or solutions need to be debugged in a lengthy and for all parties painful process.
Hence innovative software projects (the ones trying to deliver novel solutions) should be focusing more on finding the correct requirements rather than at delivering previously defined output. This is where Design Thinking and rough tangible prototyping comes into the game.
With this approach you build and test interactions without building any actual code yet. This involves user involvement from the beginning as well as playing out several types of interactions with the help of physical roughly build prototypes. A great deal of empathy is needed in this process since the developer needs to put him/herself in the position of a user and imagine what the pain points are in a certain use context.
Therefore physical rough prototypes become a valuable tool when defining the requirements of a future product in the very early stages of product development. This includes a change in the material of the prototypes as well. Now it covers a broader span of materials than only programming code. This means bringing cardboard, paper, wood or even role-play into the development process.

In this tutorial we will give a very hands-on introduction into Design Thinking and rough physical prototyping in the early stages of any kind of product development – physical as well as digital. Moreover we will illustrate how this process much faster and more holistically brings product requirements to the table. Target audience would be any person focussing on early stage product development. This includes programmers, project managers, UX-designers, UI-designers etc.

Presenter information

Martin Steinert: Martin is a Professor of Engineering Design and Innovation at NTNU and founder of TrollLabs, a rapid-prototyping and design-thinking research group. Previously, he served as Deputy Director at the Center for Design Research and d.research program (Hasso Plattner Design Thinking Research program) at Stanford University. Martin’s overarching aim is to push the boundaries for Norwegian product development teams, so that they will ideate, more radical new concepts, faster.
Federico Lozano: Fede is Asst. Professor of Innovation at NTNU, founder of Pracademy AS, a design-thinking training company, and director of DT Bergen, Norway’s first design-thinking executive-education program at the Norwegian School of Economics (NHH). Fede is also the co-founder of the Lab for Design Thinkers in Tromsø. He has great experience in the rapid-prototyping methods used in Silicon Valley since he did his MBA at Stanford University.
Matilde Bisballe: Matilde is currently a Ph.D. at IPM NTNU. Her focus is understanding the skills needed in the early stages of product design with especially focus on prototypes and the pre-choices the facilitator makes when facilitating such processes. At the moment she is working on how one can prototype and improve user-experiences of smart-products by exploring different types of shape-changing interfaces.

Learning objectives:

  • To give participants a rapid introduction to Design Thinking
  • To make participants confident with building and communicating through rapid physical prototypes.
  • To transform participants knowledge on prototypes, from being requirement testing to requirement eliciting.
  • To challenge/expand participants understanding of the physicality and materiality of a prototype

Tentative agenda

  • 09:00-09:30 Facilitators: Introduction to Design Thinking and Main Principles
  • 09:30-09:40 Participants: Presentation and Discussion of the Design Challenge
  • 09:40-10:10 Participants: Start building the first prototypes
  • 10:10-10:30 Facilitators: Talk on theory on Prototypes
  • 10:30-11:00 Participants: Continue to explore different solutions to the Design Challenge
  • 11:00-11:30 Participants: Presentation on prototypes and learning
  • 11:30-12:00 Everybody: Discussion on implications on integrating Design Thinking into companies. Including three cases.

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T2: Continuous Experimentation:
Accelerating Innovation through Highly Effective Experiments

Jürgen Münch

Reutlingen University, Herman Hollerith Center, Germany
University of Helsinki, Department of Computer Science, Finland

Description

wheels-of-value-excerptFinding the right scope for product development in order to build innovative products that customers want is crucial for success. Continuous exper-imentation is an important means to steer development towards rapid value creation and to avoid unnecessary development efforts. Insights from such experiments can directly influence frequent iterative deliveries. Continuous experimentation helps companies to gain competitive advantage by reducing uncertainties and rapidly finding product roadmaps that work. However, defining a product strategy in a testable way and running the right experiments in an effective way is hard. Setting up experiments wrong can lead to false results and wrong business decisions. Target audiences are product managers, innovation managers, startup founders, business people, software developers, and IT consultants.

Presenter information

Jürgen Münch is a Professor of Software Engineering at Reutlingen University, Ger-many, and a Research Director in the Department of Computer Science at the Univer-sity of Helsinki, Finland. He regularly teaches product management courses and helps companies to develop innovation capabilities and new digitally-enabled products and services. He specializes in software engineering, in particular data- and value-driven software development, product management, agile engineering, and startups. Results are documented in five books and more than 150 refereed publications.

Learning objectives:

  • How to identify the relevant questions we need to answer for making good product decisions
  • How to find and formulate the right hypotheses to test
  • What are the components of a good hypothesis?
  • How to define metrics that inform product decisions
  • How to select the right experiments
  • How to justify the efforts for experimentation
  • How to align experiments with your product decisions and product strategy
  • How to transition your organization towards continuous experimentation

Tentative agenda

  • Why Experiments?
  • Setting up Highly Effective Experiments
  • Achieving Breakthrough

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T3: Practical Software Security in a Continuously Deploying World

Martin Gilje Jaatun

Department of Software Engineering, Safety and Security SINTEF ICT, Norway

Inger Anne Tøndel

Department of Software Engineering, Safety and Security SINTEF ICT, Norway

Description

Internet securitySoftware security is about creating software that keeps performing as intended even when exposed to an active attacker. Secure software engineering is thus relevant for all software, not only security software. This tutorial will provide a brief introduction to the core principles of software security, and then go into specifics of threat modeling using data flow diagrams, attack trees and misuse cases. We will then introduce Protection Poker, a tool for risk estimation to be used as part of the sprint planning meeting. Attendees will try out playing Protection Poker on a case related to the previous presentations. Target audiences are developers in general.

Presenter information

Dr. Martin Gilje Jaatun is a Senior Scientist at SINTEF ICT, where he has been employed since 2004. He received his Sivilingenir degree in Telematics from the Norwegian Institute of Technology (NTH) in 1992, and the Dr.Philos. degree from the University of Stavanger in 2015. Previous positions include scientist at the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI), and Senior Lecturer in information security at the Bod Graduate School of Business. His research interests include software security, security in cloud computing, and security of critical information infrastructures. He is vice chairman of the Cloud Computing Association (cloudcom.org), President of Cloud Security Alliance Norway, and a Senior Member of the IEEE.

Inger Anne Tøndel has been a Research Scientist at SINTEF ICT since 2004, and is now also a PhD candidate at NTNU. She received her MSc in Telemat- ics from NTNU in 2004. Her research interests include software security, cyber insurance and security in smart grids.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the importance of considering software security also for ordinary software
  • Fundamentals of threat modelling in software development
  • Practical experience with playing Protection Poker as part of the sprint planning meeting

Tentative agenda

  • 09:00-10:00 Swsec basics (Martin)
  • 10:00-10:15 Small break
  • 10:15-11:00 Threat modeling (Inger Anne)
  • 11:00-12:00 Threat modeling practical exercise
  • 12:00-13:00 Lunch
  • 13:00-13:30 Protection Poker (Martin)
  • 13:30-14:30 Protection poker practical exercise

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T4: Risk-Based Software Testing: Increasing Effectiveness and Efficiency in Testing

Michael Felderer

Institute of Computer Science, University of Innsbruck, Austria

Rudolf Ramler

Software Competence Center Hagenberg GmbH, Austria

Description

risk-based-testing-an-effective-measure-to-deal-with-risks-in-software-testingRisk-based testing (RBT) is a testing approach which considers risks of the software product as the basis to support decisions in all phases of the test process. Risk-based testing has a high potential to improve the software test process as it helps to optimize the allocation of resources and provides decision support for the management. An adequate test strategy plays a key role in increasing test effectiveness and efficiency in terms of balancing product quality with cost and time-to-market. Establishing a risk-based testing approach and its integration into an existing test process is a challenging task due the lack of concrete guidelines and empirical evidence on success criteria. In this tutorial we present the concept of risk in software testing as well as a practical approach for developing a risk-based test strategy. The tutorial is based on results from previous research and studies investigating the introduction of risk-based testing in large organizations as well as the application of risk in testing in small and medium enterprises. Intended learning objectives include insights into the benefits and challenges of risk-based testing in practice, knowledge about a process for risk-based test strategy development and refinement, and an overview of open research issues.Target audiences are both practitioners (test managers, test analysts, testers) and researchers.

Presenter information

Michael Felderer is a professor at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. He holds a habilitation and a PhD degree in computer science. He has over 15 years of experi- ence in software engineering research and technology transfer. His research interests include software testing, security testing, requirements engineering, quality management, software processes as well as empirical software engineering. Michael is also a senior consultant for QE LaB Business Services, where he transfers his research results into practice and a regular speaker on industrial conferences.

Rudolf Ramler is a senior researcher at the Software Competence Center Hagenberg, Austria. He has over 15 years of experience in software engineering research and technology transfer. His research interests include software testing, quality manage- ment, and empirical software engineering. Rudolf works as a consultant in industry projects and is a lecturer with the Upper Austria University of Applied Sciences at Hagenberg, the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, and the Vienna University of Technology. He holds a M.Sc. (2001) in Business Informatics from the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria.

Learning objectives:

  • insights into the benefits and challenges of risk-based testing in practice,
  • knowledge about a process for risk-based test strategy development and re-finement
  • an overview of open research issues.

Tentative agenda

  • 09:00-09:45: Introduction and Background
  • 09:45-10:00: Benefits of Risk-Based Testing
  • 10:00-10:15: Short Break
  • 10:15-11:45: Risk-Based Testing Process
  • 11:45-12:00:Results and Lessons Learned

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T5: Experience from integrating agile development with process standards like ASPICE and ISO 26262

Dr. Even-André Karlsson

Addalot Consulting AB, Sweden

Description

software-approach-backIn many industries there is dual pressure on both being more agile and adaptive to changing requirements at the same time as being compliant with process standards like ASPICE and ISO 26262. These standards have not been adapted to agile development, and many of the underlying assumptions are based on a waterfall model. Many organizations have problems joining these two words. In this tutorial we will look at the basic principles in these some standards, and also practical experience how to incorporate them in an agile environment. Examples that we will show are e.g. how to incorporate safety activities into sprints, handling of traceability in an agile environment, handling of reviews, change management. Target audiences are industry and researchers interested in the above area, suitable with some understanding of both agile development and process standards.

Presenter information

Even-André Karlsson, Addalot, has been working with process improvements as a consultant for 25 years, mainly with large Swedish industrial companies like Ericsson, SonyEricsson, ABB, Atlas Copco. He has a Ph.D. from Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand how to be compliant with process standards in an agile process.
  • Understand the major obstacles, and possible ways to handle them
  • Get some practical experience from real world organizations that have addressed these issues

Tentative agenda

  • Introduction (50 min)
    • Who am I? Who are you?
    • Agile development
    • Process standards, e.g. ISO 26262, ASPICE
  • Areas of concern with examples (2 x 50 min)
    • Documentation
    • Traceability
    • Up front analysis and design
    • Planning and support processes
    • Safety activities

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T6: Architecture Evaluation – threat or opportunity

Dr. Even-André Karlsson

Addalot Consulting AB, Sweden

Description

Addalot has in many contexts been commissioned to evaluate the architecture of a product. There may be situaQons where you want to buy a company, taking over a product, or that you have purchased a product, but are not satisfied and want to gain a deeper understanding of the evidence and weaknesses. The purpose of the architecture evaluation is to obtain an objective analysis for future product decisions. We usually say that an architecture evaluaQon of a system is that an inspection of a car or a transfer inspection of a house – something that should be mandatory. In this tutorial we want to go through the method we use to do this, what areas we analyze, and common weaknesses and risks that we often encounter. Target audiences are people working with or interested in software architecture, or needing an evaluation of an architecture.

Presenter information

Even-André Karlsson, Addalot, has been working with process improvements as a consultant for 25 years, mainly with large Swedish industrial companies like Ericsson, SonyEricsson, ABB, Atlas Copco. He has a Ph.D. from Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

Learning objectives:

Areas that we evaluate are:

  • Functionality
  • Logical structure, interface, dynamic architecture, documentaQon and traceability
  • Flexibility, comprehensibility and maintainability
  • Scalability, performance, redundancy, security and safety (if relevant)
  • Code structure and quality
  • Testability, test strategy, automaQon and coverage
  • Future plans

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T7: Safe Scrum

Geir Kjetil Hanssen

Department of Software Engineering, Safety and Security, SINTEF ICT, Norway

Thor Myklebust

Department of Software Engineering, Safety and Security, SINTEF ICT, Norway

Tor Stålhane

Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Informatics department, Norway

Børge Haugset

Department of Software Engineering, Safety and Security, SINTEF ICT, Norway

Description

suss%20relevant%20illustrations
The tutorial will describe the SafeScrum process and then go through the important steps in agile development of safety critical systems according to SafeScrum and IEC 61508 – safety analysis, the application of the agile practices and examples of applied tool chains. The tutorial will end with a presentation of how we can adapt the agile process to other relevant standards. Target audience is developers and project managers who (1) are, or will be involved in the development of safety-critical systems and (2) will introduce agile development methods into the process

Presenter information

Geir Kjetil Hanssen is a senior research scientist at SINTEF ICT, Norway. He has a PhD in software engineering from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). His main areas of interest are software engineering methodologies – in particular agile methods, software process improvement, and safety critical systems. He is currently involved in industry-oriented research projects addressing the implementation and effect of agile methods for developing systems that will undergo certification according to the IEC61508 and DO178C standards. Founder of SafeScrum. Contact information: ghanssen@sintef.no, +47 92492454

Thor Myklebust works as research and certification manager at SINTEF ICT. He is a Cand. Scient. in physics with an additional two years at university level on Psy-chology and Statistics. He has experience in certification of products and systems since 1987 and has been a member of several international committees since 1988.
• Safety (NEK/IEC 65),
• IEC 61508 committee,
• Railway (NEK/CENELEC/TC 9) and
• NB-rail (notified bodies) since 2007.
He was vice-chairman and chairman of NB-rail in the period October 2013-October 2015. Founder of SafeScrum. Contact information: thor.myklebust@sintef.no, +4795779869

Tor Stålhane holds a master degree in physical electronics and a PhD in statistics. He worked as a developer at SINTEF from 1969 to 1988 and as a safety analyst of software intensive systems from 1988 to 2000. He then moved to NTNU where he was a professor in software engineering, teaching software engineering, process im-provement and safety analysis of software-intensive systems up to 2014. He is now professor emeritus at NTNU. Founder of SafeScrum. Contact information: stalhane@idi.ntnu.no, +47 97595326

Børge Haugset is a research scientist at SINTEF ICT, Norway. He has a Master in software engineering from the University of Oslo (UiO). His main areas of interest is agile software development and where safety meets security – in particular the com-plex problems that modern safety-critical software systems face when introduced to open networks and the Internet of Things. Contact information: bor-ge.haugset@sintef.no, +47 93420190

Learning objectives:

  • Basic understanding of safety-critical software and the IEC 61508 standard
  • Understand and apply the basic ideas of agile development of safety-critical systems
  • Create a SafeScrum process that is compliant to other relevant safety standards

Tentative agenda:

13:00 Scrum and agile software development
Introduction to safety-critical systems
13:30 The SafeScrum process
13:50 Safety analysis, hazard logs and SafeScrum
14:20 Coffee break
14:35 Use of Agile Practices when developing Safety-Critical Software
15:05 The SafeScrum tool chain and tool classification
15:30 Adapting SafeScrum to other standards than IEC 61508
16:00 End of tutorial

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T8: Lean startups in established companies: How to make it really happen and how to avoid common pitfalls

Nils Brede Moe

Department of Software Engineering, Safety and Security, SINTEF ICT, Norway

Tone Merethe Aasen

Department of Software Engineering, Safety and Security, SINTEF ICT, Norway

Description

Sustaining innovation in a company delivering services based on software is difficult. One common challenge is developing new products and services when well-defined requirements are lacking due to a high level of uncertainty of what the customer really wants. This tutorial presents one approaches to handling this uncertainty by relying on continuous experimentation and validated learning. The method “Lean Startup” is about cross-functional teams given the authority to set directions for the new product, and continuously testing out the assumptions and ideas on real customers. However, the Lean Startup team is seldom able to solve all tasks by themselves. While doing continuous experimentation, the team must align many decisions regarding with the rest of the company, which usually slows them down. Further, the team’s autonomy is reduced due to multiple dependencies, which in turn reduces the innovation potential of the team. The question is how do we have Lean Startup teams which overcome these difficulties and reap the benefits using the method. Also: Who should be part of the cross-functional Lean Startup team? Should the team be isolated? What are the consequences if the team operating independently form the rest of the organization? Target audiences are team members, team leads, project and department managers, business analysts, and HR.

Presenter information

Nils Brede Moe works with software process improvement, agile software development, Lean-startup and global software development as a senior scientist at SINTEF ICT. His research interests are related to organizational, socio-technical, and global/distributed aspects. His main publications include several longitudinal studies on self-management, decision-making, innovation and teamwork. He wrote his thesis for the degree of Doctor Philosophiae on “From Improving Processes to Improving Practice — Software Process Improvement in Transition from Plan-driven to Change-driven Development”. He is also holding position at Blekinge Institute of Technology.

Tone Merethe Aasen works with innovation management, and knowledge processes and strategies at SINTEF. Her research interests are related to innovation as participative processes, including new models and practices for collaborative innovation work. Her main publications include books and papers on innovation as collective processes in and between organizations, and on employee-driven-innovation. She wrote her thesis on “Innovation as social processes A participative study of the Statoil R & D program Subsea Increased Oil Recovery (SIOR)”.

Learning objectives:

  • Have basic understanding of Lean Startup and how to apply it.
  • Understand the challenges of such approaches in established companies related to the product owner, management, and other departments.
  • Understand the need for and how to empower the Lean Startup team

Tentative agenda:

  • 13:00 Introduction to the workshop and Lean Startup
  • 13:50 The challenges of Lean Startup in an established company – a story from an Norwegian bank
  • 14:40 The self-managing cross functional Lean Startup team
  • 15:00 Strategies for implementing Lean Startup
  • 15:45 – 16.00 Summing up and closing the tutorial

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T9: Creating Champions and battling Dragons – how to create a DevOps culture

Pål Thomassen

Bekk consulting As

Ingrid Sorgendal

Bekk consulting As

Description

Are you curious about what DevOps is, and how its practices can benefit your organization – or are you ready to implement a DevOps workflow, but struggling to break up an unyielding silo mindset?

The DevOps movement is rapidly spreading throughout the software commu- nity. A group of concepts, inspired and catalyzed by Agile and Lean approaches, there are many misconceptions of what DevOps is, and how it can be impli- mented to benefit the development and operation of software. Oftentimes, a shift to a DevOps oriented workflow requires organizational culture changes that can be difficult or even painful to undertake.

Join us for this tutorial, where we will demystify the term (and dispel some myths), and give you the tools to identify how you can change your organization into a smooth, well tuned DevOps machine.
The tutorial targets practitioners interested in shifting to a DevOps workflow; especially those struggling with change resistant cultures and/or silo cultures. However, interested researchers will also benefit from presentations as well as activities.

Presenters

Pål Thomassen is Practice Lead for DevOps at BEKK Trondheim, and board member for the Trondheim DevOps meetup. P ̊al draws from his experience as a developer in projects for small and large Norwegian businesses, both in private and public sectors. P ̊al is dedicated to improving the workflows and efficiency of development teams, all the while spreading his enthusiasm and love for the software community.

Ingrid Sorgendal is Practice Lead for User Experiences at BEKK Trondheim, and board member for the Trondheim IxDA meetup. As a User Experience

Designer, Ingrid is a seasoned facilitator with experience from a broad array of projects and customers. She oftentimes finds herself working with improving organizational cultures – enabling her customers to meet user needs, in addition to creating better working conditions for the developers.

Learning objectives:

  • To give partipants an introduction to what DevOps is (and isn’t)
  • To make participants confident with improving the culture of their own or- ganizations
  • To challenge participants on how to implement and streamline a DevOps workflow

Tentative agenda:

  • Introduction: DevOps
  • Introduction: Actor mapping
  • Activity: Map your organization
  • Introduction: Creating champions and battling dragons – Activity: Identify champions and dragons
  • Activity: Create your battle strategy
  • Wrap up: DevOps in your day-to-day workflow

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T10: Hands on with Docker

Mike Long

Praqma Norway AS

Description

Together with Praqma docker experts, this one-day course will provideattendees with a guided tour of the docker technology stack. Attendeeswill learn how to create images, run containers, debug running containers,and set up multi-container applications.

The tutorial targets practitioners interested in shifting to a DevOps workflow; especially those struggling with change resistant cultures and/or silo cultures. However, interested researchers will also benefit from presentations as well as ac- tivities.

The training will be given by a certified docker instructor, together withtechnologists experienced in implementing docker solutions. The workshopwill be hands-on, and participants will be expected to come with a laptopcapable of ssh.

Presenters

Mike Long is the CEO of Praqma Norway

Learning objectives:

  • What docker is and how to use it in software development
  • An understanding of how docker images are built
  • How to share your images with docker hub and docker registry
  • The ins and outs of running containers
  • Best practices when developing with containers

Tentative agenda:

  • tba.

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T11: User centric cloud computing

Hogne Titlestad

Friend Software Labs

Thomas Wollburg

Friend Software Labs

Description

Learning objectives:

  • understand the basic principles of liquid software
  • get an overview over the basic principles and vast opportunities of the Friend Unifying Platform, a new type of  web based operating system
  • understand the difference between remote applications and native web applications

Tentative agenda:

  • What is the Friend Unifying Platform
  • What is liquid software
  • What makes FriendUP liquid
  • Security – how FriendUP can provide a unique security scheme
  • What roles do disks play in the world of cloud computing?
  • Future outlook – application deployment in a cloudified world – possibilities and challenges
  • How to get started

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